Natural Resources Curriculum

The curriculum for the Natural Resources program is designed to be completed in two years. The Agriculture and Natural Resources department is committed to helping students achieve their degree in a timely manner. Students should follow the recommended course sequence of classes and work with SRJC Counseling to determine an educational plan.

Major

Natural Resources Major

Recommended Course Sequence

 

Certificate

Natural Resources Certificate

Recommended Course Sequence

 

Classes

The Natural Resources program offers fifteen Natural Resources courses. Questions about the Natural Resources courses or when a course will be offered can be emailed to Kasey Wade, Natural Resources Program Coordinator, kwade@santarosa.edu. To view the current class schedule, visit classes.santarosa.edu.

NRM 12 - Introduction to Environmental Conservation

An introduction to principles and techniques for the management and protection of forests and other natural resources, with an emphasis on the sustainable use of wood, water, forage, recreation and wilderness resources. Includes an examination of contemporary issues affecting the management, preservation and long term sustainability of the nation's renewable natural resources for future generations.

Recommended Preparation: Eligibility for ENGL 1A or equivalent

Prerequisites: None

Transfer Credit: CSU; UC.

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NRM 51 - Wildland Trees and Shrubs

A study of the taxonomy, physiology, community and ecological relationships of trees and shrubs of the United States, with particular emphasis on California species. Analysis of the botanical and anatomical characteristics of these plants. Includes mandatory field trips.

Recommended Preparation: Eligibility for ENGL 100 or ESL 100

Prerequisites: None

Transfer Credit: CSU.

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NRM 60 - Introduction to Outdoor Recreation

A study of historic, social, political, economic, and environmental factors influencing outdoor recreation at federal, state, and local levels. Survey of conflicts in natural resources land use.

Recommended Preparation: Eligibility for ENGL 100 or ESL 100

Prerequisites: None

Transfer Credit: CSU.

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NRM 63 - Environmental Education

Principles and applied techniques used to explain natural and cultural resources to the park and museum visitor. Exploration and application of most current environmental education curricula.

Recommended Preparation: Eligibility for ENGL 100 or ESL 100

Prerequisites: None

Transfer Credit: CSU.

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NRM 67 - Recreation Facility Management

Students learn to evaluate public and private recreational facilities. Applied park practices relating to the operations of campgrounds and other types of recreational facilities. Through participation in recreational activities, students identify facilities needing repair or redesign or removal. Includes skills and procedures for designing and evaluating low impact camping, day-use facilities, and visitor centers. Recommended physical ability to walk five miles with a 25-pound pack.

Recommended Preparation: Eligibility for ENGL 100 or ESL 100

Prerequisites: None

Transfer Credit: CSU.

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NRM 70 - Forest Management and Assessment

Applied forestry as related to forest stand improvement, harvest methods, fire control, disease, damage, insects, manufacturing and management of forested lands. Quantity, and quality, and other forest resources, including water, range, wildlife, and outdoor recreation, carbon storage and fuel loading. Field trips are mandatory.

Recommended Preparation: Eligibility for ENGL 100 or ESL 100

Prerequisites: None

Transfer Credit: CSU.

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NRM 72 - Forest Fire Control and Its Use

Principles of fire behavior, control and prevention for natural resource managers and first responders. Also covers the prescribed use of fire in natural resource management applications (fuel reduction, invasive species control, etc).

Recommended Preparation: Eligibility for ENGL 100 or ESL 100

Prerequisites: None

Transfer Credit: CSU.

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NRM 80 - Environmental Policy for Resource Managers

A study of major state and federal, environmental policies and how they affect natural resource managers. Students will examine the making and implementation of laws and regulations that help frame natural resource management decisions on the local level.

Recommended Preparation: Eligibility for ENGL 100 or ESL 100

Prerequisites: None

Transfer Credit: CSU.

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NRM 84 - Introduction to Fish and Wildlife Conservation

Introduction to the study of fish and wildlife conservation management principles, techniques, and issues, including habitat management and population estimation. Students will become familiar with local and regional wildlife species, as well as develop expertise in wildlife identification and common field techniques used by wildlife managers.

Recommended Preparation: Eligibility for ENGL 100 or ESL 100

Prerequisites: None

Transfer Credit: CSU.

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NRM 86 - Watershed Resource Management

Introduction to the methods and techniques used in measuring, monitoring, and assessing watershed health in North Coast streams. Topics of study include identification of the specific factors limiting ecoysystem productivity (vegetation, fish, etc) identification of the critical habitat needs (plants, macroinvertebrates, water quality, etc) and methods for assessing and monitoring watershed resources.

Recommended Preparation: Eligibility for ENGL 100 or ESL 100

Prerequisites: None

Transfer Credit: CSU.

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NRM 87 - Geographic Info. Systems Applications in Natural Resources

An introduction to the use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to analyze and interpret natural resources data, and to solve common conservation problems. Includes a basic introduction to ArcView GIS, analysis of habitat loss for endangered species, evaluation of mineral development impacts, watershed analysis, assessing data quality, and environmental analysis associated with timber management.

Recommended Preparation: Course Eligibility for GIS 40

Prerequisites: None

Transfer Credit: CSU.

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NRM 88 - Watershed Ecology and Restoration

An introduction to watershed restoration ecology methods, techniques, and tools used to restore and enhance watershed health.

Recommended Preparation: Eligibility for ENGL 100 or ESL 100

Prerequisites: None

Transfer Credit: CSU.

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NRM 91 - Rangeland Management

Basic principles of range management as they apply to various regions and vegetative types. Relationship of range management practices to livestock production, wildlife management, forestry, hydrology and other land uses. Field trip participation required.

Recommended Preparation: Eligibility for ENGL 100 or ESL 100

Prerequisites: None

Transfer Credit: CSU.

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NRM 103 - Restoring Native Habitats

Hands-on approach to restoring local habitats using native plants in the landscape. Overview of natural plant communities as models for restoration. Course includes study of dominant and typical plant constituents of major plant communities in Sonoma County, focusing on species currently used in restoration. Students will do field work at Shone Farm for other Sonoma County locations, matching plant species to local conditions for successful restoration/reforestation.

Recommended Preparation: Eligibility for ENGL 100 or ESL 100

Prerequisites: None

Transfer Credit: None

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NRM 111 - Orientation to Environmental Resource Management

Orientation to principles and practices of environmental resource management in wildland areas. Each lecture is supported by a field experience. Field trips are mandatory.

Recommended Preparation: Eligibility for ENGL 100 or ESL 100

Prerequisites: None

Transfer Credit: None

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